History As Told By The Internet

If it's on the internet, it must be true.

A Forum for Personal History

The History of the Cellphone tells a personal narrative by Rebecca Jane Stokes as she shares the role each on of her cellphones played in her life. 

beatonna:

I love reading bad reviews of classic books on Amazon and Goodreads


In regards to my previous post on bad reviews of classic masterpieces. Everyone has always been critical, now the internet gives everyone a voice. 

beatonna:

I love reading bad reviews of classic books on Amazon and Goodreads

In regards to my previous post on bad reviews of classic masterpieces. Everyone has always been critical, now the internet gives everyone a voice. 

11 Early Scathing Reviews of Works Now Considered Masterpieces

11 Early Scathing Reviews of Works Now Considered Masterpieces

 Jon Seder’s post is a good source for historical critic of now idolized cultural landmarks. While some negative opinions mentioned in this article are better known (Impressionism in mid 1800s), others may come as a surprise to readers. I personally have never understood why Wuthering Heights has managed to weasel its way onto every high school English class syllabus, so I find the original reviews of the book not too far off. Seder’s article is a good reminder to modern learners to place classical works in historical context and that popularity and mastery are not always synonymous. Unless of course we are talking about Harry Potter, in which case J.K. Rowling may take her seat on the thrown of great contributors to culture at her earliest convenience (no test of time needed). 

Ten Fun Things To Do After You Are Immortalized In A Wax Museum

Ten Fun Things To Do After You Are Immortalized In A Wax Museum

NPR pop-culture blogger, Linda Holmes reminds us of a form catalogue of historical content overlooked by history scholars: Wax Museums. What could make history come more alive than walking among life-size uncomfortably-accurate replicas of major figures both past and present. Though I have not had the courage to go to a wax museum myself after seeing Paris Hilton star in a horror film on the popular type of attraction, Holmes’ article inspires me to do something worth getting a spot in one for a wax version of myself. Ben Franklin’s famous quote about immortality now seems quaint: 

If you don’t want to be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and decayed; either write things worth reading, or do things worth writing about.

Importance is no longer measured by influence on litterary topics, but on whether people will pay to see a wax replica of you. 

History Crushes

A collection of the more thrilling characters of history their narratives. Bonnie and Clyde pictured below are just the start of a collection of attractive historical figures, or as I like to call it: History, the romantic version. 

Cakes Throughout U.S. History

The Lively Morgue: photos from the New York Time Picture Archive

Tumblr! The platform for archive sharing! Here is an excerpt from the about section of The Lively Morgue tumblr. 

"We’re eager to share historical riches that have been locked away from public view, and have been awaiting a platform like Tumblr that makes it easy to do so. We hope you’ll enjoy the serendipity of discovery, that you’ll know something of the thrill we feel when we unlock the door of the morgue and walk into a treasure house made of filing cabinets, index cards, manila folders and more 8-by-10s than anyone can count."

Weightwatcher Recipe Cards from 1974

EWWWWWWWWW. 

Ok, as a collection of dietary trend documents of the 1970s, I will give this post some historical credit. Why someone would ever be researching the history of Weightwatcher foods, I cannot possibly imagine. As a web source of pointless and slightly disgusting historical fact, I suppose it will do even though there is no explanation of the artifacts displayed. Retronaut is a digital source of cultural and societal history. Its tagline reads: “The past is a foreign country. This is your passport.” Users can recommend topics to the site and the administrator creates collections called capsules. It has the most bizarre and fascinating picture collections of people, places and things normally looked over by historical databases because of their lack of importance. If you have three or four days to kill, I highly recommend it. I think it is a tribute to one of the best things the digital age has to offer historical academia: diversity. 

(Source: retronaut.co)

Coke vs. Pepsi History in an Infographic

If you are passionate about your team in the never-ending Coke vs. Pepsi war (go Coke!), or really just the least bit curious about the two mega corporations, this interactive infographic is really impressive. It features changes in recipes, organization timelines, charts, graphs, advertisements, photos, videos and more. I did a little bit of digging to see if I could find a website with more information, but nothing came up in my 5 minutes of skimming the web. Although, the infographic does have a list of sources at the bottom, so I suppose I could have started there. Even if there was another outlet with the two companies compared side by side, I cannot imagine a better way to display the history of the organizations and their rivalries. I think that this historical narrative is well served by the resources the digital age has to offer. 

If Countries had Facebook During WWII

Another telling of historical events through social media for your entertainment… and mine.